Simulation Results

Introduction

Most simulation results are presented as graphs.  You can select which graphs to plot in Report Options.

If you want to copy the graphs to another program, use the  button on the toolbar.  Select the graph you want, and press the copy button.  Press the data button if you would like a table of the data used to plot the graph.

A discussion and sample of the available graphs follows.


Passenger Demand

Passenger Demand plots the traffic that has been generated as a result of your inputs in Building Data and Passenger Data.  The traffic is divided into traffic up and down the building.

You can view this graph for any one run, or for an average of all runs.



Figure 17   Example Passenger Demand graph, from all levels

You can also view this graph for any floor.  The following example represents the total traffic originating from level 4 which is travelling up (upper axis), and travelling down (lower axis).


Figure 18   Example Passenger Demand graph, from single level


Total Passenger Activity

Total Passenger Activity plots the traffic that has been generated as a result of your inputs in Passenger Data.  This is a “stacked” graph.  The lower line is the incoming traffic originating from the Home floor.  The second line adds on top the interfloor traffic.  And the top line adds on top the outgoing traffic, travelling towards the Home floor.

You can view this graph for any one run, or for an average of all runs.


Figure 19   Example Total Passenger Activity Graph


Passenger Transfer by Floor

Passenger Transfer by Floor plots arrivals and departures from the selected floor.  This corresponds to what you would observe if you were standing on the landing, counting people as they unload and load the car.

You can view this graph for any one run, or for an average of all runs.


Figure 20   Example Passenger Transfer Floor graph


Queue Lengths

Queue Lengths shows how many people are waiting at elevator landings.  This graph is plotted as a scatter diagram.  Each time the queue length changes, another dot is plotted.

This graph can be plotted for a selected floor, or for all floors.  If you are plotting “all floors”, the graph corresponds to the total number of people queuing on all the elevator landings.

If you plot the “Average of all runs”, the queue lengths for every run are plotted on top of each other in different colours.

You can view this graph for any one run, or for an average of all runs.


Figure 21   Example Queue Lengths graph


Spatial Plot

Spatial Plots draw a trace of each car’s movement.  Spatial plots can be selected for all cars, or for each car individually.

You can select the spatial plot for any single run.


Figure 22   Example Spatial Plot graph


Car Loading on Departure from Home Floor

Car Loading on Departure from Home Floor shows you how full the cars are at the beginning of a round trip.  This is of particular interest during up peak traffic.  The lower line shows the average loading in each five minutes.  The upper line shows the highest loading in each five minutes.

You can view this graph for any one run, or for an average of all runs.

The right hand side y axis (persons) is only displayed when Elevate determines that you have defined all cars to have the same capacity and all passengers to have the same mass.

For double deck cars, the plot refers to the loading of the lower car only.


Figure 23   Example Car Loading on Departure graph


Car Loading on Arrival at Home Floor

Car Loading on Arrival at Home Floor shows you how full the cars are at the end of a round trip.  This is of particular interest during down peak traffic.  The lower line shows the average loading in each five minutes.  The upper line shows the highest loading in each five minutes.

You can view this graph for any one run, or for an average of all runs.

The right hand side y axis (persons) is only displayed when Elevate determines that you have defined all cars to have the same capacity and all passengers to have the same mass.

For double deck cars, the plot refers to the loading of the lower car only.


Figure 24   Example Car Loading on Arrival graph


Dispatch Interval from Home Floor

Dispatch Interval from Home Floor plots the interval in each five minutes.

The dispatch interval is the average time between cars departing from the main home floor.   This is calculated by counting the number of times a car is dispatched from the home floor in each five minute period.  Then dividing this number into 300 seconds (5 minutes).

You can view this graph for any one run, or based on an average of all runs.



Figure 25   Example Dispatch Interval graph

Note that during interfloor or light traffic the car may not stop at the home floor regularly.  This results in large values for the interval.  Thus, at times when there is little traffic to or from the home floor, interval is not a good measure of performance.

BEWARE!  In simulation a good interval does not necessarily correspond to good performance.  For example, the interval may be 20 seconds, but if there are queues on the landing passengers may have to wait two or more intervals before there is enough space for them to get into an elevator.  A good interval in a simulation applying destination control simulation does not necessarily correspond to good waiting times, as passengers are often not allocated to the next car to depart from their floor.


Average Waiting Time and Time to Destination

Passenger Waiting Time is defined as the actual time a prospective passenger waits after registering a hall call (or entering the waiting queue if a call has already been registered) until the responding elevator doors begin to open.  If the responding elevator doors are already open when a passenger arrives, the waiting time for this passenger is taken as zero.

Passenger Transit Time is the time the responding elevator doors begin to open to the time the doors begin to open again at the passenger’s destination.  If the responding elevator doors are already open when a passenger arrives, the transit time for this passenger commences at the time the passenger arrived.

Time to Destination is the Passenger Waiting Time plus the Passenger Transit Time.

The Average Waiting Time and Time to Destination graph is plot for each 5 minutes.  The lower line is the Average Waiting Time.  The upper line is the Time to Destination.  The difference between the two lines is the Passenger Transit Time.




Figure 26   Example Average Waiting Time and Time to Destination graph


Passenger Waiting Time Results

Passenger Waiting Time is defined as the actual time a prospective passenger waits after registering a hall call (or entering the waiting queue if a call has already been registered) until the responding elevator doors begin to open.  If the responding elevator doors are already open when a passenger arrives, the waiting time for this passenger is taken as zero.

Elevate plots against the right hand side y axis, a graph showing what percentage of passengers have waiting times less than or equal to the value on the x axis.  A dotted line identifies the 90 percentile.

Plotted against the y1 axis, Elevate identifies the number of passengers who have waited in each of the specified time ranges.

Elevate also calculates the Average Waiting Time, and identifies the Longest Waiting Time.  If the Number of simulations to run for each configuration is greater than 1, Elevate presents the average result, and a range, e.g. 30.0 (+5.1/-1.5).


Figure 27   Example Distribution of Passenger Waiting Times graph


Passenger Transit Time Results

Passenger Transit Time is the time the responding elevator doors begin to open to the time the doors begin to open again at the passenger’s destination.  If the responding elevator doors are already open when a passenger arrives, the transit time for this passenger commences at the time the passenger arrived.

Elevate plots against the right hand side y axis, a graph showing what percentage of passengers have had transit times less than or equal to the value on the x axis.  A dotted line identifies the 90 percentile.

Plotted against the y1 axis, Elevate identifies the number of passengers who have had a transit time in each of the specified time ranges.

Elevate also calculates the Average Transit Time, and identifies the Longest Transit Time.  If the Number of simulations to run for each configuration is greater than 1, Elevate presents the average result, and a range.


Figure 28   Example Distribution of Passenger Transit Times graph


Time to Destination

Time to Destination is the Passenger Waiting Time plus the Passenger Transit Time.  Elevate calculates Average Journey Time and Longest Journey Time.

Elevate plots against the right hand side y axis, a graph showing what percentage of passengers have had a time to destination less than or equal to the value on the x axis.  A dotted line identifies the 90 percentile.

Plotted against the y1 axis, Elevate identifies the number of passengers who have had a time to destination in each of the specified time ranges.

Elevate also calculates the Average Time to Destination and, and identifies the Longest Time to Destination experienced.  If the Number of simulations to run for each configuration is greater than 1, Elevate presents the average result, and a range.


Figure 29   Example Distribution of Time to Destination graph


Car Service

This graph plots the availability of cars as part of the group.  In simulation all cars are assumed to be in service at all time, so this graph is only useful when using Elevate as a traffic-monitoring tool in real installations.  (To model cars being out of service in simulation you can simply delete a car in Elevator Data.)

Energy Consumption

If the Energy Model has been turned on, this graph plots the cumulative energy consumption.  The total energy consumption and cost is recorded below the graph.


Figure 30   Example Energy Consumption graph


Spreadsheet Results

In addition to the standard Elevate report, you can transfer the data and results, as currently displayed, to Excel by selecting View, Results Spreadsheet.   Alternatively, press the  button on the Toolbar.  If you use a spreadsheet other than Excel, and want to use this spreadsheet facility, please contact Technical Support.



Figure 31   Spreadsheet output of results

Additional results provided in the spreadsheet include:

  • Up, down and total motor starts for each elevator.
  • Total up and down running time for each elevator.
  • Number of times dispatched from home for each elevator.
  • Number of hall calls up, down and total.  Average response time.
  • Hall call analysis by time of day.
  • Hall call analysis by floor number.
  • Hall call response time distribution.
  • Car call analysis by time of day.
  • Car call analysis by floor number.
  • Car call response time distribution.
  • Passenger list – includes details of every passenger included in the simulation, what time and floor they arrived at, which elevator they used, their waiting time and journey time, etc.

For more information about these results, please contact Technical Support.